Friday, 6 February 2015

Go home.... ??





















Most office people work from 08:00 until 16:00, so NOW it is time to GO HOME and enjoy the weekend!
This is a building from the 1970´s. And what I call typical for that period.....
Best thing is probably that it is very central and easy to reach by public transport.

Are you working at the weekends?
Here we have a huge debate as to whether or not the shops should be open on Sundays.
Well, we have to "try" trust the politicians that we voted for, and wait to see if there will be changes or not.

7 comments:

Mo said...

Too many people are working too many hours for even less money than a few years ago. Not good

William Kendall said...

Here Sunday shopping was introduced in the 90s. I don't particularly think it's added to revenues. People spend the same, and workers have less of a chance for a breather if they're on call for working that day.

Halcyon said...

Here in Germany (or at least in Berlin), shops are open one Sunday a month. I think it's a good compromise. But the workday here is usually 9h00 - 18h00. I like 8h00 to 16h00 much better!

laura.forestdreams:) said...

i work just monday to friday, but here, all stores are open on sundays. usually the people who work weekends, have days off during the week.

VP said...

I usually work Monday to Friday. Here most of the shops are open on Saturdays and a few also on Sundays.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Most shops here are open on a Sunday.. but for myself I prefer not to go shopping on a Sunday, not for religious reasons but just because it then becomes just like any other day oui..

Jamie Martin said...

If I had any influence on Norway, I'd say, "Do not change your laws to allow stores to be open on Sunday!". I remember the days here in Washington State when everything was closed on Sunday. It was inevitably a peaceful day, with church in the morning and a nice afternoon lunch/dinner. After the law changed, Sunday became like every other day: a day of commerce. It forces workers to forgo the traditional weekend which means that often during holidays or special family functions they are required to work and miss their special events. Write to your Norwegian politicians and tell them to vote, "No!". Once this law is passed you'll never reverse it. Inevitably, politicians who support the change do so because they are being influenced by business lobbyists.